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Body of Korean War POW from Littleton returns to New Hampshire

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The body of a Littleton, New Hampshire, man killed in the Korean War is returning to the Granite State. Sgt. Alfred Sidney was listed as a missing prisoner of war until August, when scientists were able to match his DNA at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, or Punchbowl Cemetery, in Hawaii. The Littleton native was reported missing in action in May 1951 after his Unit was attacked in South Korea. A POW who returned home said he died two months later when he was 23. His niece, Carlene Hartford, said she never met her uncle, but she remembers the effect his loss had on her mother. “Growing up, I could feel that hurt.” , as children do,” Hartford said. “But she never showed it and only spoke of beautiful experiences with him.” Hartford’s mother has since died, but her aunt, Sidney’s remaining sibling, lives in a nursing home in New Hampshire. Members of the VFW Post 816 in Littleton joined Massachusetts State. Police and firefighters as Sidney’s casket arrived Thursday at Boston Logan International Airport. “We’re honored to be here,” said VFW Cmdr. Joe Currier. Hartford said it’s important that her uncle’s remains return home. “There’s healing that takes place when one soldier comes home,” she said. “Healing that I think is really important for all of us to become more aware of.” Sidney’s family is heading to Hawaii in a few weeks to visit the Punchbowl Cemetery, where a rosette will be placed next to Sidney’s name to indicate that he has been accounted for.

The body of a Littleton, New Hampshire, man killed in the Korean War is returning to the Granite State.

Sgt. Alfred Sidney was listed as a missing prisoner of war until August, when scientists were able to match his DNA at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, or Punchbowl Cemetery, in Hawaii.

The Littleton native was reported missing in action in May 1951 after his unit was attacked in South Korea. A POW who returned home said he died two months later when he was 23.

His niece, Carlene Hartford, said she never met her uncle, but she remembers the effect his loss had on her mother.

“Growing up, I could feel that hurt, as children do,” Hartford said. “But she never showed it and only spoke of beautiful experiences with him.”

Hartford’s mother has since died, but her aunt, Sidney’s remaining sibling, lives in a nursing home in New Hampshire.

Members of the VFW Post 816 in Littleton joined Massachusetts State Police and firefighters as Sidney’s casket arrived Thursday at Boston Logan International Airport.

“We’re honored to be here,” said VFW Cmdr. Joe Currier.

Hartford said it’s important that her uncle’s remains return home.

“There’s healing that takes place when one soldier comes home,” she said. “Healing that I think is really important for all of us to become more aware of.”

Sidney’s family is heading to Hawaii in a few weeks to visit the Punchbowl Cemetery, where a rosette will be placed next to Sidney’s name to indicate that he has been accounted for.

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