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Mississippi lieutenant governor visits Jackson restaurants

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Mississippi Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann made his way to Jackson restaurants today as they try to navigate the ongoing water crisis and boil water notice. Johnny T’s Blues and Bistro on Farish Street was first on his list. “They’re open for business, this place is packed down.” here,” Hosemann said. “They’ve taken all of the health care precautions and all of that … our waiters and our cooks they’re all here and they’re ready to serve us.” According to the owner of Johnny T’s, John Tierre, it’s not just the boil water notice adding strain to the restaurant. “This is a tough time for Jackson restaurants,” Tierre said. “Not only dealing with the water crisis but on top of that dealing with labor shortages, rise in food costs, things of that nature, now is the time to collectively come together and actually support local restaurants.” The Manship in Belhaven was another Jackson restaurant that the lieutenant governor visited.”This campaign for Jackson restaurants is extremely important. Our confidence as restaurateurs probably hasn’t been this low if it ever was, it’s been since March of 2020 during COVID,” managing partner of The Manship Steven O ‘Neill said. O’Neill says they experienced low water pressure at one point due to the recent water crisis, forcing them to bring in a water tank and portable bathrooms.”It is safe to dine in Jackson. We’re taking every precaution necessary. Bringing in bottled water, soda, bagged ice, and different things and compounding those added costs with lower guest traffic has really put our restaurants in a lot of jeopardy,” O’Neill said. Both Hosemann and restaurant own ers say that despite the water crisis, Jackson restaurants remain open and ready for customers.”Putting together this whole event where they’re going around to different restaurants and patronizing and eating local. That’s fantastic, because what that does is, it shows the rest of the customer base what should be done at a time like now,” Tierre said. “Whatever it takes we’ll get back to regular. And we need for them to be here when we get that,” Hosemann said.

Mississippi Lt. Gov. Delbert Hosemann made his way to Jackson restaurants today as they try to navigate the ongoing water crisis and boil water notice.

Johnny T’s Blues and Bistro on Farish Street was first on his list.

“They’re open for business, this place is packed down here,” Hosemann said. “They’ve taken all of the health care precautions and all of that … our waiters and our cooks they’re all here and they’re ready to serve us.”

According to the owner of Johnny T’s, John Tierre, it’s not just the boil water notice adding strain to the restaurant.

“This is a tough time for Jackson restaurants,” Tierre said. “Not only dealing with the water crisis but on top of that dealing with labor shortages, rise in food costs, things of that nature, now is the time to collectively come together and actually support local restaurants.”

The Manship in Belhaven was another Jackson restaurant that the lieutenant governor visited.

“This campaign for Jackson restaurants is extremely important. Our confidence as restaurateurs probably hasn’t been this low if it ever was, it’s been since March of 2020 during COVID,” managing partner of The Manship Steven O’Neill said.

O’Neill says they experienced low water pressure at one point due to the recent water crisis, forcing them to bring in a water tank and portable bathrooms.

“It is safe to dine in Jackson. We’re taking every precaution necessary. Bringing in bottled water, soda, bagged ice, and different things and compounding those added costs with lower guest traffic has really put our restaurants in a lot of jeopardy, ” O’Neill said.

Both Hosemann and restaurant owners say that despite the water crisis, Jackson restaurants remain open and ready for customers.

“Putting together this whole event where they’re going around to different restaurants and patronizing and eating local. That’s fantastic, because what that does is, it shows the rest of the customer base what should be done at a time like now,” Tierre said.

“Whatever it takes we’ll get back to regular. And we need for them to be here when we get that,” Hosemann said.