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New Orleans EMS uses unique lifesaving technique for the 100th time Sunday morning

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The New Orleans EMS administered blood to a woman shot on Bourbon Street Sunday morning while she was still in the street. They say this is a rare ability for EMS services across the country and saves lives. Thomas Mauro was the paramedic who gave her the blood using a Lifeflow device. He was able to get blood into the victim in just 10 minutes as opposed to the normal 40 or so minutes it can take to get victims’ blood in a hospital. “Quick, rapid blood administration is the most important thing you can do besides getting them to the hospital as quickly as possible. I feel better now that I can make more of a difference than I could before,” Mauro said. This was the 100th time New Orleans EMS was able to use this service since it launched almost exactly a year ago. They say they are seeing much better outcomes for people facing trauma that received the treatment, as opposed to those who didn’t in years past. “My first ever blood administration the patient normally would not have done well but by the time we got that patient to the hospital they were talking, and they weren’t talking before,” Mauro said. They say other EMS services across the world are looking to them as an example and are trying to institute the practice in their own cities. “Regardless, you know New Orleans will probably continue to face challenges, but we will remain dedicated to rise to that and continue and giving residents and visitors in the state of New Orleans the care that they need. So, whether 100 was high or 100 was low, regardless of why we’re giving it, we were just happy to,” said New Orleans EMS Capt. Janick Lewis. The service is currently being paid for out of the EMS budget. Patients are not charged. Data is continuing to be collected to determine the effectiveness of the treatment, but members say it seems to be effective.

The New Orleans EMS administered blood to a woman shot on Bourbon Street Sunday morning while she was still in the street. They say this is a rare ability for EMS services across the country and saves lives.

Thomas Mauro was the paramedic who gave her the blood using a Lifeflow device. He was able to get blood into the victim in just 10 minutes as opposed to the normal 40 or so minutes it can take to get victims’ blood in a hospital.

“Quick, rapid blood administration is the most important thing you can do besides getting them to the hospital as quickly as possible. I feel better now that I can make more of a difference than I could before,” Mauro said.

This was the 100th time New Orleans EMS was able to use this service since it launched almost exactly a year ago. They say they are seeing much better outcomes for people facing trauma that received the treatment, as opposed to those who did not in years past.

“My first ever blood administration the patient normally would not have done well but by the time we got that patient to the hospital they were talking, and they weren’t talking before,” Mauro said.

They say other EMS services across the world are looking to them as an example and are trying to institute the practice in their own cities.

“Regardless, you know New Orleans will probably continue to face challenges, but we will remain dedicated to rise to that and continue and giving residents and visitors in the state of New Orleans the care that they need. So, whether 100 was high or 100 was low, regardless of why we’re giving it, we were just happy to,” said New Orleans EMS Capt. Janick Lewis.

The service is currently being paid for out of the EMS budget. Patients are not charged. Data is continuing to be collected to determine the effectiveness of the treatment, but members say it seems to be effective.

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